Is the [WAH Program] a Scam or a Legit Work from Home Business?

  • Date: October 13, 2021
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Being an internet entrepreneur for some time now, I’ve seen some business models come and go over the years.

Recently, I’ve seen the WAH Program gain some traction and popularity.

As with all these opportunities that arrive on today’s internet, I look into them encase they’re a new money-maker. But after reading their sales page and the promises they’re offering, I became somewhat sceptical.

As I dived deeper and deeper into their so-called “link-posting” system, I started to feel nervous about the idea and wanted to express my feelings about the topic.

The WAH Program is a complete scam and something that everybody should avoid. After carefully studying their promises, testimonials, images, and much more, it was easy to determine that the WAH Program that claims to teach you about posting links for money is entirely false. I mean, after all, $400 every 60 minutes is rather impressive. Why would they want to tell anybody about this “loophole”?

Okay, now I understand posting links online can generally make you money through the affiliate marketing business model.

But, being an affiliate myself, I can certainly tell you that $400 every 60 minutes just isn’t real.

In this article, I’m going to uncover my reasoning for believing that the WAH Program is a scam that everybody should avoid.

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What is the WAH Program?

Before we jump into why I think the WAH program is a scam, let me describe what they’re trying to offer.

The WAH Program was created back in 2014 by someone called Bobbie Robinson (this isn’t for definite, but this is the name they’ve used on their sales page).

They claim that they’ve worked a hard and regular day job and miraculously discovered a loophole that they could make upwards of $400 an hour.

This would be super impressive if it were true… However, the WAH Program aims to educate individuals to also achieve this level of success.

It promises you it’ll be able to provide you with this level of income by following their link posting technique.

In other words, affiliate marketing.

But to gain real money from a business model like this, there’s much more to it than what meets the eye.

For example, to become a successful affiliate marketer, I expect you to have good skills in creating online sales funnels, outstanding social media marketing knowledge, and some money behind you.

But without going on too much about what the WAH Program is about, let’s talk about why I truly believe this “educational” service is a complete scam.

1.The Promise

My first reason to believe that the WAH Program is a massive scam is due to its promise. It sounds too cliché and straightforward.

Most of the time, when something seems too good to be true, it totally is.

Currently, the USA’s average salary is around $125 a day, so how does $400 a day sound? And in only 60 minutes? Wow, we could all retire and rent a lovely beach hut in the Caribbean, amazing.

But don’t get me wrong, the business model they’re addressing (affiliate marketing) is legit, just not the way they’re proposing it.

If you want to make money with affiliate marketing, you have enough educational videos on YouTube and great affiliate networks like Maxbounty and Clickbank that can provide you with affiliate offers.

However, if you choose to hop into the affiliate marketing world, get ready for a wide range of emotions and a rather steep learning curve.

But if you’re able to master it, the possibilities are endless.

2.Sales Page

Being an affiliate marketer myself, I’ve studied many sales pages to gather more knowledge on what converts and not.

After my first glimpse of the WAH Program’s sales page, it imminently stood out to me as a scam.

These were the three main features of the sales page that automatically made me think the WAH Program wasn’t legit.

  • Fake urgency – Something I commonly see people incorporate into their sales funnel, but because I know it’s a simple plug-in, I can also identify that it’s fake. As you head onto the sales page, it automatically warns you that they’re only three spots available for the program. This is to make the user feel like they need to purchase the education fast before it’s completely full. However, no matter when you head onto this sales page, they’ll only ever be three spots available.
  • Geolocation Title – You may or may not have seen this before, but because plug-ins and coding have advanced so much recently, text or images can change depending on your geolocation. For instance, within the title, it says, “make money from your computer in ‘your location'”. The ‘your location’ part of the title will determine where you live and replace it with your actual IP location.
  • Sales Video Actor – I recognized the sales video actor but just couldn’t put the finger on it. After filtering through some forums, I discovered that the actor is just a freelancer from Fiverr. The funny thing is, she claims to be the owner “Bobbie Robinson”, which really doesn’t help with trustfulness.

I must say the actor is very popular on Fiverr gigs, if you want to check out what here gigs are click on this link alliemadision12 Check her out on Fiverr

3.Fake Testimonials

Next is the bold statement suggesting that the WAH Program has been promoted on such News websites like NBC, ABC, Fox News, USA Today and CNN. Strange, because I’ve never heard of it before.

The likelihood of me not hearing about this on the news, through a family member, or colleague is extremely unlikely.

They have written testimonials on their sales pages which are just awfully written and are not very convincing. After all, how does “Regina”, who’s retired, know about this fantastic opportunity and I don’t? 

4.Stock Photos

If the above hasn’t convinced you that this program is a complete fraud, this may help you decide.

Stock photos are readily available across the web nowadays, and even better, it’s super simple to find where images originate from.

By saving the image of their “Regina” testimonial, I performed an image search on Google.

To my discovery, I found that the file was first uploaded to istockphoto. This is a stock image website that allows creators to sell their photos online.

WAH Program current domain taken Down

WAH program

Conclusion

As you can clearly see, this so-called money-making program isn’t what it’s sold to be.

I’m also aware that people have probably brought into this system, hoping they can change their lives only to become disappointed with the outcome.

It’s a massive shame to the online community and to whoever built this false claiming website.

After reviewing their landing page, it quickly became apparent that I needed to tell people, and fast

The best way was through this article, and now I hope you understand why this WAH program is a scam.

I also hope you now have better knowledge of what to look out for in future sites that may offer similar services.

if something online sounds too good to be true, it probably is, and you should stay far away from it.

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